Useful Emailing Phrases

As you learn English, you’re not only communicating in person. You also communicate via email. Oftentimes, English learners don’t focus on expressing themselves fluently via email, or they are not sure if they should be using formal or informal language. English in emails also often has different kinds of phrases compared to when speaking in person or writing for classes. So learning how to communicate fluently via email is great progress to mastering English in all contexts. Check out this article with a list of 100 useful emailing phrases that is “essential language for the beginning, body and ending of formal and informal English emails.” Recommended for intermediate learners and above (Levels 400+).

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70 ways to improve your English

Fall Quarter will finish soon, and in the long Winter Break, don’t let your English get rusty. There’s lots of interesting and fun ways for you to continue improving your English. Many of them can be done in your daily routine and hobbies! Take a look at this list of 70 ways to improve your English. You’re probably doing some of them already, but it’s always great to find new things to try. Recommended for all levels.

We’ll be on Winter Break for about a month after next week. Check back on January 10, 2017 for updates.

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How to Write a Summary

For English students learning how to summarize, check out this video on how to write one; it explains the things you should and shouldn’t do for an effective academic summary. Apply these tips the next time you read a text. Recommended for intermediate to advanced learners (Levels 400+).

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That Missing Comma!

Commas often go missing in many learners’ writing because grammar rules are confusing! It’s hard to remember all the rules, and commas can be especially confusing–they’re so small, but they have a major impact on the flow and meaning of a sentence. Here’s a great video that focuses on one specific topic–commas for compound sentences. Watch the video (it’s great for listening practice with a native speaker too). The next time you write compound sentences, you’ll know where that comma should go! Recommended for intermediate learners (Levels 300-400).

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What are they saying?

Here’s some food for thought (or, here’s something for you to think about): ever wonder why you can’t understand some native English speakers? Teacher Gabby discusses why in the interesting video below. She explores the situations where English seems different–sometimes it’s easier for you to understand, but in other situations, it’s very difficult. Gabby also offers tips and suggestions to improve your listening skills. Recommended for intermediate learners (Levels 300-400).

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